Jukeboxparables

WT2010 – CANADA – Day 49/50/51/52/53 – On and On and On in Toronto, ON

Posted in Travels by jukeboxparables on May 6, 2010

WT2010 – CANADA
Day 49/50/51/52 – On and On and On in Toronto, ON
[On the iPOD] Pulp / The xx / The Beatles / Los Campesinos! / Gotye / Siouxsie & The Banshees / Le Tigre / Bikini Kill

Well I picked the time to leave Montreal! It went from a nice warm-sunny 20degrees (Celsius) to -2 overnight and I was met with SNOW in the morning (which is apparently very rare this time of year) The wind started to pick up and I started to worry. Sure I’d endured the worst Alpine-rainy conditions on the way to Portland, OR but this was SNOW and yet again I was in a front-wheel drive rental Nissan Versa (with questionable tyres) I quickly got the scope of driving on a freeway though; keeping the tyres in tracks made by large trucks hence keeping them slightly warmer than running your own lines on snow. The wind and snow picked up to the point where I had the wipers on full-blast and I was overtaking most cars. Even so it was a good 3hrs of snow-storm freeway before the clouds started to clear.

When you eventually get into the city-scape of Toronto, it has the same International-fresh feeling that Vancouver does, only better weather. My hotel was on the top floor of a shopping centre; I was slightly worried about this but it turns out it’s an advantage; you have access to the array of cheap fast-food buffets on-hand in the foodcourt and the room was actually rather brilliant (probably the best so far on this trip) No plans for day one after the tiring 6hour drive but what better way to learn your surroundings than explore aimlessly.

I headed for an Intersection which just happened to be none other than Queen St W, which is scarily like Newtown in Sydney, right down to its music stores, tattoo parlours and herds of hipsters on the streets. After walking one way down, I decided to head the other and towards the towers of the CBD. The shops change from vintage-used-hobo-sheak to the typical International labels with hefty price tags you’ll find everywhere in this part of the world. But theres also an array of cool bar-restaurants that give this part of town a really cool vibe.

Toronto has a tram network, how similar this makes the area look to Melbourne is uncanny. Exactly like being in Fitzroy in Melbourne. I remember thinking great I’ve travelled 15,000km to go to Melbourne. It was interesting to note driving in also that the pushy-rudeness of drivers in Montreal hadn’t transferred to Toronto. It must be a French thing.

Toronto has some amazing Architecture; besides an array of Modern-futuristic sky scrapers that fill the CBD theres also older style heritage sites. A stand out though is the College of Arts building which looks like something of out Samuel Youd’s series of novels; The Tripods.

Some night photography and thai food rounded out a busy day.

After sleeping in and some more wandering about on day two I decided to head to the CN Tower, which was a bad idea because it was like $36 to go up. This sounds expensive but doable but unfortunately I’d made the proper commitment to cutback on expenditure upon arriving in Toronto (tightass? Well I’m 2g over budget and haven’t even arrived in the UK yet) A view of Toronto is something I could pass on.

The weather took a turn for the worst later in the day so I headed back to shelter, later in the night however I met up with a friend Cathy I’d met in a New York city hostel, scarily although she’d been living in Toronto she is originally from a suburb in Sydney 15minutes from mine. You really can’t escape us Australians no matter where you go the world over. I’d heard Canadians in Japan talk about something called “Poutine” so I was promised a late night venture to one of the better vendors of this Canadian delicacy. It’s basically hot chips with a covering of cheese, which then melts when you cover it with shit-hot gravy! Your given a spoon and encouraged to dig-in. It’s an experience for sure (especially great on a cold day)

On Friday I decided to head to Toronto Island, yes there is an island off the coast of the CBD. You hop a ferry for $6.50 and in about 10minutes your staring at an amazing panorama of the Toronto city-scape. The island itself is a lazy playground of sorts. A huge park with places to picnic, a small amusement fair for kids, animal farm, port for yachts and some landmarks. One side even has a beach! the best part about the place however is there is a plethora of cement bike paths criss-crossing about the island. You can rent a bike for as long as you desire.

This will sound rather silly but I’d forgotten how much fun it is to actually ride a bike without purpose. Just for the sheer fun of exploring and the convenience of effortless speed. I literally circled the entire island, a beach view, a lighthouse, local bird life. People actually have holiday houses in certain areas. Pretty great considering it’s a 10min ferry ride from a bustling CBD and you feel like your on a sleepy-town beach-island. I decided to make like the locals and a bunch of tourists and laze around some on the grass. A good change of pace from days of doing anything and everything.

Quite tired from kms of peddling I was walking past Queen St W on my way back to the hotel when I saw some local BMX bandits kick over a parking sign and then use it to flip jumps off on the footpath in betweens gaps of pedestrians! This was too good to pass up so I brought out the camera for some action shots. Some of the photos are rather good as one of the riders was getting some serious air and even went on to jump 2 of his mates standing up!

Final day in Melbourne’s doppelganger sister city, what better thing to do than to hit Kensington Market. Basically a collection of backstreets just west of china-town. The hipster/hippy/alternative/antique/collectible/used/vintage crowd is all represented here. A stretch of the area is essentially people having all collectively decided to turn their front-yards into shop stalls selling their own clothing and wares! I hadn’t seen anything like this since Tokyo! pretty amazing.

One store had every conceivable novelty instrument, I pondered purchasing an accordion more than once. Another had oldschool toys such as an array of gaming consoles to easy-bake ovens (in boxes) Another a shelf of used cameras, some with film still inside! After getting some food I stumbled to a small park near the area and pretty much fell asleep. The long bike ride the day before catching up to me perhaps?

Later than night before heading out I decided to visit a store called “Ed Harry’s” which is the inspiration for an amusing scene in the comic series Scott Pilgrim Vs The World. Unfortunately it was closed, so I didn’t get to experience it’s blinding brightness but got photos none the less. I had to call it an early night because I was up 4:50am the next morning for the drive back to New York and a stop off at Niagara Falls on the way!

Racing towards the border I made it to the Falls just after sunrise (the signs really don’t help you when approaching, a small 5minute detour into town eventually led me to the falls) You had to pay ridiculous amounts for parking; luckily it was just past 6am and there were no attends so I raced in for free, dodged the misty spray from the water and stood there taking in the sun clearing over some clouds. The area was also deserted, the average tourist not keen enough for 6am on a sunday morning luckily. The mist covered up half the view but it was awesome none the less!

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WT2010 – USA – Day 42/43/44 – New York, NY (Antiques, Art, Memorials & Alcohol)

Posted in Travels by jukeboxparables on April 26, 2010

WT2010 – USA
Day 42/43/44 – New York, NY (Antiques, Art, Memorials & Alcohol)
[On the iPOD] Brainiac / The Replacements / Sparklehorse / David Bowie / The Libertines / New Order / Pink Floyd / American Football / Dizzee Rascal / The Whitest Boy Alive / The Thermals / Johnny Foreigner

Heading over to Brooklyn for the last time, I wanted to see if I could find some more bargains in the excellent shops around there. Wandering into an antique furniture store for no real reason. It’s really interesting checking out antique stores in foreign countries because their cultural history is so dissimilar to anything you’ve experienced back home. Amongst the furniture were toys, instruments, trinkets and nik-naks. Something that stood out in this particular store was a huge collection of ‘Life’ magazines dating back decades. Flicking through them is like stepping back through time.

Another interesting collection near the vinyl music section of the store was a collection of photos, literally in a huge pile in a 2metre wide crate, you trawl your fingers through them finding snapshots of memories people had shared and mattered at some point in time. It’s funny how you can discern what era a photo was from by the style of print of the photo and fashion/style of the subject. There was something from every decade from the 20’s and 30’s I’d say. Another area had boxes and boxes of postcards; used and new dating from as far back as the 1920’s. I flicked through them reading the messages from sender to recipient, one dated 1917 another 1946 and another 1974. I literally wanted to read them all but it would have taken days.

Wandering onwards to a used clothing exchange, a cool shirt for $10; perfect. My stomach rumbling I wandered back to the main strip and a Pizza place. Have I mentioned New York’s obsession with Pizza? It’s utterly ridiculous, there is one on every corner and that’s not an exaggeration. This particular store had an amazing selection and was probably the best I’d had in NY. I was then staring down at the wall eating my bbq marinara ranch chicken with pineapple! when I noticed a banner reading “Welcome new recruits” and the logo reading “DHARMA” hold on…

An Internet link flashed straight into my mind. Over a year and a half ago I came across an Internet link where someone had blogged about being in Hawaii and roaming around in-where they somehow stumbled on the shooting location of the TV series “Lost” and found a whole bunch of props from the show unattended and started taking photos. I linked everyone I knew to this blog because I thought it was rather amusing (and I loved the show at the time)

I was all set to ask the attendant where the hell he’d gotten the banner but then overheard people in the booth next to me talking about it first hand; “So a guy who worked here was in Hawaii and…” (long story short It was the same guy!) and apparently he decided to take the banner as a souvenir. Here I am, having traveled 15,000km and I randomly stumble into the guy’s Pizza place staring at the very sign I’d seen online.

Got back to my hostel and spoke to a dorm mate Bryan who was going to see a movie with other pals, I ended up tagging along (the movie being Kick Ass, which is an apt movie title) Afterwards they all decided to head for drinks in Lower-Manhattan so I tagged along. Next thing I knew we were putting cool songs on the jukebox and ordering pitcher after pitcher and approaching 3am (on a tuesday mind you) we decided to grab some food and call it a night.

We were wandering towards the subway when Bryan spotted an Art mural being posted up. As it turns out the mural was this The Artist being none other than Shepard Fairey (he was actually there finishing it off) The name sounded familiar but it didn’t click. I’d soon realise it was the same artist responsible for the world-famous OBEY works. Bryan knew his work a lot better than me (I think a friend had mentioned him in passing a few years back) But it didn’t click immediately. It was quite the experience, seeing this being worked on whilst tipsy drunk in New York and actually meeting the Artist there.

The Following day and I’d been pondering visiting the WTC site. I didn’t initially want to do it, because I knew it’d effect me profoundly and I’d be on a downer for the rest of the trip which is not to be disrespectful but In the end I decided I had face up to reality and do it. I hopped a train down to the financial district and wandered about there first. I came across a man bowing down before a giant bull-statue (the symbol for wealth/wall st? I’ve been told?) I’m not sure if it was performance art or simply some poor disgruntled American whose lost his home thanks to the recent Crisis’ (He was yelling at it; “Are you mocking me?”)

I’ve always laughed off banking conspiracies (you know the ones about the major banks of the world knowingly plotting in some clandestine/cult-like fashion to control everything; a tip of the hat to the empires of Rome) It all still sounds like utter crap, except for the Architecture and sheer money put into these buildings. They do almost to some extent look like ‘holy’ shrines to a bankers/traders money-fueled way of life.

The WTC site is huge, the footprint of the area below where the towers stood is probably two regular city blocks. My first impression of the people around was one of ‘We’ve got work to do” the cranes and construction workers scaling cast-steal beams in the far distance directing the pieces of a new tower in place. Signs around me point you in the direction around the site though I stopped short at a fire-station memorial with a placard of the faces of some 100 firefighters who scrambled as fast as they could to get into the towers to help people only to give the ultimate sacrifice in doing so.

Around the corner was a permanent memorial cast into the walls of the building. Some personal effects of one of the family members hung off it along with flowers and a flag nearby. The area was mostly tourists and school kids visiting, learning about the scale of what happened and what the future of the site will hold. The plans included a few things; from a new tower, to a park, to a memorial to two huge receding 2-tiered-level square ponds (which occupy the original footprint of the two towers) which will look amazing at night I think. For now the area is a buzz with construction. I tried taking some long-distance photos of the construction workers erecting steal only to have one walk past me and whistle at his buddy 50metres up as if to say ‘look good, your on camera’.

The vibe of the area is one of reserved pride. All the workers minds are on the job; getting these plans built whilst all the tourists stand solemnly in remembrance gawking at the new constructions forming before them. I will visit this place again when it’s completed. I think it’ll be a fitting tribute, you can always trust Americans for that. America is a country built on a secular constitution and I believe this place is holier than any place of religious worship.

Wednesday night was a trip back to Brooklyn and a venue by the name of the Brooklyn bowl to see Portland’s finest The Thermals with the best Jerseygirl ever; Molly. The band played a solid set which numbered something like 16songs-18songs. It was the second show in two days (the show the night before sold out) The crowd got treated a huge selection of songs spanning all of their albums with songs from The Body, The Blood, The Machine and last album Now We Can See seeming to get the biggest crowd response. Lead singer Hutch Harris exclaiming they were playing a longer set than yesterday because It was the last show of the tour, he also mentioned their new album is finished and being mixed by Chris Walla and will be out soon. For me; “Here’s Your Future”, “We Were Sick” and “I Called Out Your Name” were stand-outs. The band also played the song off the split 7″ vinyl they’ve released with The Cribs (which I hadn’t heard yet) amongst other new material which sounds rad overall. Full of energy, but plenty of room on the floor. The Brooklyn bowl is amazing; It’s a bowling alley and a restaurant and a venue in one. And you can see the band no matter what your doing! They even had projection screens above the ten-pins so you won’t miss anything if you’d rather bowl and drink and have the music as a live soundtrack.

Thursday, Last day in New York. I was considering visiting The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) because people have said it was ‘good’ but I kind of felt “museumed out” but after hearing Bryan and Ed rave about some of the installations there I knew I had to go. Luckily it closed 8:45pm on a Thursday. Little did I know what I’d run into…

I was expecting another run of the mill gallery, instead I got 6 levels of wow. Ill quickly summarise some of the stand out moments. Marina Abramovic is a performance artist who uses her body as her medium. She’s been doing this since the early 1970’s (in installation form) and MoMA just happened to be showing a retrospective of all of her ‘works’. For the first time, her older works were being performed by other people whilst she was present in a new piece which struck me as soon as I walked in.

It was a room with a square painted on the ground; A table in the centre and 2 chairs, one with Marina sitting there in an eye-catching red ceremonial style gown and the other free for members of the audience to participate in. People queued around the square watching on as Marina and a member of the public stared each other down. There was no time-limit for a person to sit there, some took 5minutes some an hour or more. I actually walked through other exhibits and came back to find the same women sitting there. For some it was too much, they’d leave with tears in their eyes perhaps recalling sad memories or successfully having read some in the blank stare of the artist herself. The performance was filmed and streamed on the Internet live and a photographer took photos of the participants which you can find here I overheard an array of comments from; “How completely lazy” to “I don’t think I could go up there” and “This is intense”. My interpretation of it was a commentary on the interaction between people on a daily basis, the distractions of speech and meaning removed.

I wandered through the works of Picasso for sometime then eventually moved on to more modern works like those of Kentridge. On my way up through the levels of sculpture and design I reached the second last level and walked in to find Van Gogh’s The Starry Night staring me in the face. I kind of froze, In the single art class I’d failed in high school we were made to re-draw this painting. It took me awhile to adjust to realise I was actually looking at the real thing (I wasn’t aware it was hung in America let alone the museum I’d just wandered into on a hunch) It is one of my favourite paintings to this day. Nearby were other Van Gogh works as well as those by Munch, Cezanne, Matisse, Picasso and Dali. What can one say other than wow.

I’d missed some of Marina Abramovic’s other retrospective works however I think they had closed for the night. They were being performed by other people one of which an interpretation of her 1974 work entitled “Rhythm 0” was chillingly retold to me by my mates at the hostel it goes like this;

A woman was in a room by herself, only accompanied by a table with 72 objects on it; including scissors, markers, a whip and knives and a gun with 1 loaded bullet. The audience was instructed to use the objects on the women as they saw fit they were also allowed to put her limbs in any position. Initially people used the markers to draw on her and put her arms in certain positions but as time went by people started to use the knives to cut her (on the face) and it all slowly culminated to the point where an audience member, grabbed the loaded gun, placed it in the hand of the women, moved her arm and pointed the gun towards her own head and began to pull the trigger only to have the audience gasp in shock horror and head to pull it away.

MoMA really is one of the best museums I’ve ever been to. My last stop before closing however was the Henri Cartier-Bresson exhibition. Basically he is the original intrepid exploring photographer. Starting in the 1930’s. As you enter the walls are plastered with maps of his journeys, he literally travelled everywhere before the average person knew what ‘there’ looked like and he took a huge array of photos being published by magazines such as Life, he also helped establish an photographers right to own his work. India/Indonesia during Independence / China during the revolution / USSR and the death of Stalin / The American post-war boom. He covered everything from the average shot of the everyday person to portraits of icons. I kind of got inspired after seeing his work and travels. Just thinking about it all logistically (how one traveled the world with camera gear in the early 20th century) It was utterly impressive.

I wandered around towards the Apple store on 5th Ave and that was pretty much the end of the day, my last set of photos in New York were black&white of random people interacting on the sidewalks of Midtown Manhattan some sort of pathetic attempt or homage to Cartier-Bresson? I don’t normally focus on strangers but I thought I’d give it a shot.

Later that night involved vodka, beers and generally a good time at the hostel (a hostel party of sorts)

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WT2010 – USA – Day 17/18 – Los Angeles

Posted in Uncategorized by jukeboxparables on March 27, 2010

WT2010 – U.S.A
Day 17/18 – Los Angeles
[On the iPOD] The Smiths / The Cure

I felt like I needed a change of pace from driving everywhere, even though I’d only been doing it for two days. I found some interesting directions to something called The Giving Tree, which I’ve since learnt is based on a book. Basically it’s a ‘hidden spot’ in the hills surrounding L.A well known to hikers but not really anyone else. So I went to check it out early in the morning.

The directions were purposely poetic, I wasn’t sure what to expect really but as instructed parked in a certain car park and saw a bunch of joggers/hikers heading up this trail where the road/car park had ended and the hills somewhere near the Hollywood sign began.

When I say poetic; think along the lines of “When you see the dragon on your right, you’ll know your on the right path” etc. Amusing, but an adventure none the less. I followed the directions and as the trail path began to rise I started to wonder how far this damn tree was going to be. Eyeing the path on the other side of the valley, it looks like it winds kilometres and kilometres which I wasn’t exactly dressed for hiking. Though passing sweaty hikers on the way down I continued to climb and climb.

Eventually you could see the Hollywood sign to your distant left, It would’ve made a good photo but theres a hill obstructing “HOL” so I pressed on. And then after some more twists and turns there it was on the right; a large grand tree with an open-knot-burrow in the centre of it and a red box placed right before the hole. It’s called the giving tree but it might as well be called The Wishing Tree I suppose. People have written their wishes on hundreds of different pieces of paper and placed them in the box or in the tree itself. Somehow they seemed in good condition, it must shield them all from rain naturally.

It wasn’t utterly awe-inspiring but I think it’s more of a destination to make you actually trek the 1.5km or so up the hill “It’s the journey, not the destination” type deal. The hills in that area are actually rather amazing and so is the view. If someone had suggested I go for a hike I probably would have told them no thanks (in a more abrupt way)

So I trekked my way down, sliding in places in my grip-less chuck taylors. Basically every hiker would greet you with a smile and a ‘heya’ I also observed a lady with seven, yes seven dogs in a range of sizes all on their own leash. How one is supposed to hike with that much chaos is beyond me.

I then headed to MOCA; the Museum Of Contemporary Art which currently was hosting a “30years of MOCA” exhibit. Some interesting works, mostly I found myself sighing at some works. Contemporary Art isn’t really my thing but I suppose that’s part of the experience you find yourself loving some things and hating others. Some of the photographers works on show were pretty mind blowing. I generally dislike work “setup or staged” to provoke, its just really hard to do it and not be cliched. Even though these were master photographers I found myself scoffing at some artful shots. Someone has to do it I suppose.

When photographers are more candid, its wholly more interesting to me. The best photography in my mind are shots that are entirely spontaneous and then capture the moment in a way that almost makes it seem as if it were staged. I guess you could say “documentary style” but alluring to something more, something “almost staged” perhaps it’s their subject matter that makes them seem this way. Nan Goldin and Larry Clark were standouts for me.

The MOCA exhibition actually had two venues, the other being in Little Tokyo 10blocks or so away, So I made the trek over and it was worth it. I had three! different people randomly come up to me and comment on my shoes (Im currently wearing mis-matched cons because I wore the inside of one out in Tokyo) or maybe I’m just a hipster wanker.

Too much walking! so I headed back to my hotel and decided to head to a venue called Spaceland at night. After missing out on the soldout gig at The Echo the day before I really really didn’t want to miss another show. Heading there like 10pm I circled the venue for parking for like 10minutes! Shows are really popular in L.A apparently. I kept getting further and further away until I was like 6 blocks away and it was past 10:30pm I thought; to hell with this and headed to the venue from the night before The Echo; which was bound to have some good music right?

$12 entry and I walk in to find lazers hitting my eyes, people wearing hoodies and some hip-hop/electronic mashup stuff on stage. Ohhh FFS!….. As much as this isn’t me I decided to get a drink anyway because I couldn’t be bothered driving anywhere else. The headline band was more electronica and better than the one before / had a guy with a guitar; this looked slightly more promising.

Queue a bunch of knob twiddlers hitting the stage and playing a bunch of samples on laptops and then a guy in a mask stage diving over and over whilst his laptops played his sick mixes. /cuesarcasm I was thinking wow these guys are really good. /endsarcasm. They naturally had projectors running in the background of their set bombarding the crowd with a visual art component which had to win some points or something. One screen played a bunch of handpicked retro cool 80’s videos which I must admit were rather amusing. The other screen however was connected to a laptop which was connected to a webcam pointed at the crowd which was connected to… yes you guessed it, chatroulette. Needless to say I called these guys knob-twiddlers at the start of this longwinded paragraph and then that’s exactly what we all had to witness on a 100″ projector screen. Cocks and Electronica… and I paid $12 for this. What worried me more was the excitement of some “doods” in the crowd at all this.

They did have one or two good tracks though I must admit. Still.

Anyway long story short, I met some cool people who ended up showing me around Echo Park / Silverlake one bar featuring a wank security guard who didn’t want to let an Australian in. We eventually found some bar with a couple of free seats for drinks though. So in the end it was a good night!

Part of the reason the gang was in a rush to show me around Thursday night was because I was sure I was checking out Friday morning. I checked iCalender the day before, where I’ve planned everything out and sure enough I was. Fast forward to me rushing in the morning to get my stuff packed and taking 30minutes to find my spare doorcard which I couldnt checkout with to then rush to reception to ask for checkout; only to be told I’m checking out tomorrow! She was right. Id somehow stuffed up the calendar entry on my laptop. So with a free day to spend circa 12pm already and nothing planned I decided to head to LACMA.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art; which had two exhibitions one on the last 30yrs of Renoir the other on American Stories (Collection of classic American Art) I don’t have any photos because they weren’t allowed but I’ll just summarise by saying the American Stories exhibition was eye opening and really good. I had lunch beforehand which was rather disappointing. A “side” was listed as “home-made crinkle cut chips” I was thinking something else; eating steak with potatoe chips (per you’d find in a plastic packet ala doritos) is a recipe for a coronary disaster eww.

Friday night in L.A! I’ve got to say up until this point it’d been disappointing. Some good shows but just not hugely memorable. Well Friday night L.A finally!! delivered. Theres a venue known mostly to locals that goes by the name of “The Smell” it’s been around for awhile and was quite notorious back in the day for being dingy as hell; I’ve heard stories of it from punk peeps who have talked about having to dodge dumpsters, garbage and the odd hobbo fight to get there and struggle to find the entry of it. Police constantly patrol the area to keep bad shit from going down.

Though I’ve gotta say that’s all in its past. It has a website now and everything. Basically it’s an artspace/warehouse off a lane in L.A that looks kind of dingy but definitely has character. It’s All-ages, No Alcohol and most of the time ALL bands are $5. These are basically the venues 3 rules. There were five, yes five! bands on the bill starting from 9pm. $5! Brilliant.

I turned up kinda early to find people slowly walking, no music yet so I sat on a couch and noticed they have a permanent in house ZINE collection as well as a book shelf. I picked up a zine called “These Days” as was blown away. Couldn’t put it down and wanted to steal it. Maybe I’ll find it online.

Eventually a band kicked off and people slowly made their way to the floor (the opening band plays on the floor) but they were rather impressive. “Wounded Lion” was their name. They had a 60’s garage-rock vibe with a bit of surfrock, lots of reverb on guitars etc. They actually changed lineups for several songs and had some catchy numbers but seemed like they only had one gear and were better with one lineup than the other.

Second band “The Splinters” an all-girl group. They were kind of fresh really, not as tight as Wounded Lions and had some okay songs in the riotgrrrl style ala The Breeders but others were in a classic rock vibe which wasn’t my thing. I took a breather outside. Que “Jeff The Brotherhood” kind of blues-rock inspired ala anything involving Josh Homme which I really don’t vibe on at all. They were tight and loud but I sat in the other room wondering when they would finish.

Then a fresh-faced trio by the name of “Charlie and the Moonhearts”, fucking wow. Energy reminiscent of Cap’n Jazz (and thats a huge compliment) kids began to circle pit. The bassplayer/singer strums his bass (playing chords) as if he were playing rhythm guitar in a hardcore punk band, the sound is thick and they are immensely tight. I can’t pigeon hole it really. It’s punk/grunge drumming meets garage-noiserock guitars meets 60’s surf-pop-rock vocals (with a pinch of screaming) The only problem this band has is they only have one speed and one rhythm and thats pound pound pound, it got repetitive kind of quick but the energy was constant so thats all that mattered. They closed with a sped-up-alterno cover of early 60’s number one hit “Runaway” by Del Shannon. Which was the highlight. If this band relaxes and finds other avenues of melody look out for them.

Headliners were “Ty Segall” think classic rockabilly or proto-punk ala The Cramps but more up-tempo and with some screaming. Some standout songs and overall pretty tight. It was a pretty good bill overall. I later found out the bands have actually detoured off SXSW so hence the good lineup of bands. I chatted to a bunch of people and ran into some fellow travellers who were in L.A and the venue for the first time also. It’s interesting the crowd this venue draws. It’s unpretentious, its dirty, its fresh and not many people know about it. For example whenever you hear about L.A you hear people instantly mention The Viper Room, after actually looking at the bands on the bill complete with posing-“imawesome”-pamphlets of wannabe hardrock or metal warriors, who the fuck would go there when you’ve got something as natural and pure a venue as The Smell in town.

The site of 100 kids in a laneway up against the fence and wall as cop cars slowly rollby giving everyone the dirty is priceless.

L.A I salute your dingyness.

I have a bunch of photos but most are in FILM but here are the ones I’ve got;

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